British GQ on Burbery Owning Earth Day 2020


April 22, 2020. According to British GQ Magazine, Burberry just owned Earth Day 2020.

SeanBlog | Nordstrom Earth Day 2020

The front page of Nordstrom.com on Earth Day 2020

April 22, 2020. A post for Earth Day 2020 that I am quite exited to share.

Understanding and addressing how human behavior impacts human health and the environment has been the string that connects a pretty diverse career for me. One of the first chapters in my career was launching the initial Sustainable Business & Development program at Nordstrom back in the early 2000s. You can read a little bit about how I and several other colleagues at Nordstrom to sparked the program and philosophy that exists today in this post from 2006, Sean in the Loop.

Following my 13 years at Nordstrom I co-founded the Sustainable Style Foundation (SSF) which some people described at the time as an oxymoron since it would be hard for fashion and sustainability to co-exist (although SSF actually worked across 15 design and style industries). In 2014, H&M created a global campaign titled "Sustainable Style" and the term has been used extensively over the years.

So, on the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, to see the Nordstrom home page and their dedicated Earth Day page share their philosophy and goals around 'sustainable style' makes for quite a proud papa for this father of the term 'sustainable style'. There is still much work to be done around sustainability in style and design industries, particularly around bringing social and cultural sustainability into the conversation, but it does feel good to know that some headway has been made. A snapshot of the dedicated Earth Day 2020 page appears below.

Nordstrom's dedicated Earth Day 2020 page.

One thing remains the same since my early days in high school when I first took an interest in international environmental issues, I am not and don't try to be 'perfect' in these matters, but I can continue to make more and better sustainable personal lifestyle choices that continue to respect people and place going forward.

I continue to be a firm believer in my thoughts long ago at Nordstrom and SSF's motto...that we can look fabulous, live well, AND do good.

Just one of Nordstrom's several pages dedicated to 'sustainable style'.

H4H Habitude 010 | Support a Cause

Image credit: Pexels from Pixabay

The last of our top ten H4H Habitudes is also quite easy and perhaps one of the most satisfying.

Finding and supporting a cause that you are passionate about can be one of the most fulfilling and rewarding sustainable personal lifestyle choices you can make. Whether it is pet adoption or breast cancer, supporting Veterans or the wildlife conservation, connecting to causes that you care deeply about and then investing time and/or financial support to those causes will provide the opportunity to make an impact in an area in which you

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H4H Habitude 009 | Be a Role Model

Image credit: SnapwireSnaps from Pixabay

One of the easiest things we can all do to make the world a better place is to be good role models. We can be role models for our family, our friends, and for anyone that we might interact and/or engage with. By sharing the sustainable lifestyle choices that you have made with others, you become a model and an inspiration for others to make similar sustainable personal lifestyle choices.

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H4H Habitude 008 | Celebrate People and Place

Carving of navigator Ngatoroirangi on the cliffs at Mine Bay, Lake TaupoMaster by Māori Master Carver Matahi Whakataka-Brightwell. View a video on the carvings below. Image credit: holgerheinze0 from Pixabay.

Perhaps one of the most important things we can all do to live sustainably and make more sustainable lifestyle choices, is to learn about and to celebrate people and place.

In every part of our world, cultures that have existed for thousands of years are working to keep their culture and traditions alive and available for generations to come. From Azerbaijan to America, Ireland to India, and New Zealand, Zimbabwe, if you look you will always find a long standing host culture that is active, thriving, and persisting in our modern world. Whenever you move or travel to a new location, take some time to learn about the past, present, and future of the place-specific host culture of that area and you will find your experience much more rewarding.

Once you've learned about the cultural heritage of a place you live in or are visiting, take some time to learn about the key geographic features. We all know that visiting a major natural landmark can be life-changing. So it should come as no surprise that living near a certain river, in a certain valley, or next to a certain mountain range has shaped the way the local host culture views the world and if you let it, it can help shape your worldview. Find out what rivers and mountains define the area and bioregion, learn about waterfalls and prairies nearby, and plan to spend a lazy afternoon walking through a forest or hanging out by a pond to watch wildlife. Speaking of wildlife, take some time to learn about the native plants and animals of the places you live and visit. From butterflies to bats, you'll most likely be quite surprised by the number of species that occur only in the place your are living or visiting.

Do all this and you'll have a whole new appreciation for the people and places where you live and travel.


The story of the Mine Bay Māori Rock Carvings in New Zealand



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Additional Resources

H4H Habitude 007 | Be Waste Aware

The Noble Narwhal's Bamboo Cutlery Set.

Being waste aware is just as important as being a resource aware (see H4H Habitude 006). Taking the time to consider what the options are for a product at the end of it's life can help reduce the overall impact of your purchases.

According to zerowaste.com, the average American sends 4.4 pounds of waste to the landfill EACH DAY. Between the actual products that get thrown away, from food and clothing to appliances of all sizes, and the packaging they come in, there are many, MANY ways to reduce waste.

Buying second hand, buying higher quality, buying the right amount of a product, taking care of products, and buying products that can be recycled or upcycled at the end of their original useful life are all ways that you can proactively reduce waste. Plastic waste is especially problematic due to the overall amount of plastic waste being produces and the fact that it breaks down into microplastics which has additional negative impacts on human health and the environment.

Resources
>> EPA Reducing Waste: What You Can Do
>> Medeline Olivia's "30 Ways to Reduce Your Waste

Aditional Reading

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H4H Habitude 006 | Be Resource Aware

As of March 2019, Levi Strauss's water programs have saved more than 3 billion liters of water and recycled more than 1.5 billion liters of water. Image credit: manusama from Pixabay.

In our modern world, it can be very easy to pick up a bottle of wine, a new pair of jeans, or new couch, or even a new car. What is not easy is to know or understand the resources that go into that item that you just purchased.

Levi Strauss calculated that it takes 713 gallons of water to produce one t-shirt (most of which is used in irrigating cotton fields) and 2,113 gallons of water to produce a pair of leather shoes. There are also energy inputs, chemicals that are part of the production process, shipping, and packaging (did you know most apparel items arrive at stores individually wrapped in plastic?).

Taking the time to learn about the resources that go into the products you buy is very important because when you know more, you can make more informed purchases. Water usage, energy inputs, materials, and packaging are all elements of products you can explore to learn about the resources involved with their manufacturing.

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H4H Habitude 006 | Be Resource Aware

As of March 2019, Levi Strauss's water programs have saved more than 3 billion liters of water and recycled more than 1.5 billion liters of water. Image credit: manusama from Pixabay.

In our modern world, it can be very easy to pick up a bottle of wine, a new pair of jeans, or new couch, or even a new car. What is not easy is to know or understand the resources that go into that item that you just purchased.

Levi Strauss calculated that it takes 713 gallons of water to produce one t-shirt (most of which is used in irrigating cotton fields) and 2,113 gallons of water to produce a pair of leather shoes. There are also energy inputs, chemicals that are part of the production process, shipping, and packaging (did you know most apparel items arrive at stores individually wrapped in plastic?).

Taking the time to learn about the resources that go into the products you buy is very important because when you know more, you can make more informed purchases. Water usage, energy inputs, materials, and packaging are all elements of products you can explore to learn about the resources involved with their manufacturing.

>> Jump to more Habitudes

Related Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)